São Gonçalo Bridge Amarante

São Gonçalo Bridge Amarante

São Gonçalo Bridge (Ponte de São Gonçalo) is the main attraction in Amarante, 50 km east of Porto. The granite bridge spans the River Tâmega.

View of the bridge of the River Tamega at Amarante
View of the bridge showing the Igreja de São Gonçalo, semi-circular verandas and spires


History

The present bridge dates from the late 18th century and replaced a 13th century structure that collapsed in a flood in 1763. There may have been an even earlier Roman bridge as there existed a Roman road from Amarante to Guimarães and Braga.

Religious images that once adorned the collapsed bridge were placed inside the Igreja de São Gonçalo.

The new bridge was later the scene of heroic resistance over two weeks by the townspeople in 1809 against the invading French in the Peninsular War (1807-1814).

The bridge has three arches with the largest arch in the middle. Semi-circular verandas with stone benches on the bridge are pleasant places to sit and relax. At each end of the bridge there are two pairs of Baroque spires.

Nowadays, the bridge is flanked by the Igreja de São Gonçalo and several cafes, bars and restaurants with views of the river.

São Gonçalo Bridge Amarante
São Gonçalo Bridge Amarante

Access - Getting There

Amarante has regular bus connections from the bus terminal south of the river at Avenida Primeiro de Maio to Porto (1 hour), Braga (1 hour, 20 minutes), Vila Real (1 hour, 40 minutes) and Guimaraes (50 minutes).

Amarante is no longer connected by railway but from the former train station the recent Ecopista da Linha Tâmega is a cycling/hiking track running 9 km to the former station at Chapa, along the picturesque river valley through pine and eucalyptus woods.

Other Bridges in Portugal

Bridges in Lisbon

Ponte de Lima Bridge

Ponte Romana Tavira

Ponte Velha Silves

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Coronavirus Information Portugal June 2021

Information on Coronavirus in Portugal, June 2021

At the beach, safety comes first
At the beach, safety comes first

A year into the Coronavirus pandemic in Portugal has seen the situation much improved. Infections are down and vaccinations are well underway.

In May 2021 Portugal was added to the UK's green list for travel overseas. However, in a disappointing U-turn last week the country including the islands of Madeira and the Azores were placed on the amber list after only 3 weeks on green. This means visitors to Portugal from the UK must self-isolate when returning home for 10 days.

The decision came as a surprise considering the UEFA Champions League Final between two English teams, Manchester City and Chelsea, went ahead in Porto on May 29.

The disappointing, some would say disgraceful, behaviour of some English fans at that event and subsequent infections among them may have played a part in the UK government's decision, along with a rise in cases of the Delta variant, first detected in India.

On 2 June, Portugal had 5.4 new cases per 100,000 people per day, slightly higher than the UK at 5.1 new cases. From next week people over 60 in Portugal will not need an appointment. They can attend their local vaccination centre for a jab.

Hopefully, Portugal may return to the green list in the very near future.

Information from the Info Praia app showing occupancy at  beaches in Faro and Lagos on the Algarve
Information from the Info Praia app showing occupancy at beaches in Faro and Lagos on the Algarve

Beaches

Portugal's many fine beaches are open to the public and apps such as Sandspace and Infopraia provide detailed, real-time information on how crowded the country's beaches actually are at any given time.

Visitors from other EU countries such as Germany, France, Holland and neighboring Spain are able to enter Portugal.

Coronavirus infection in Portugal on June 3
Coronavirus infections in Portugal by region on June 3

Information on Covid-19

If you want to find the latest information on the Covid-19 situation in Portugal, the best place to head for is the Serviço Nacional de Saúde website (sns.gov.pt). It has daily reports on the total number of Covid-19 suspected cases, confirmed cases, the number of recovered cases, plus deaths in all of Portugal's regions and main towns.

The stats are presented by region and by city. Lisbon, the capital, and the surrounding area is the most affected, followed by the north, centered on Portugal's second-largest city, Porto.

The Algarve and Alentejo are the least affected regions of the country.

Further information for UK travellers to Portugal can also be found at visitportugal.com

Private clinics offering PCR tests in the Lisbon area
Private clinics offering PCR tests in the Lisbon area


PCR Test Clinics

You can find a list of private clinics offering PCR tests in Portugal here: destinoseguro.azores.gov.pt

Covid-19 Centro de Testes
Covid-19 Centro de Testes

Covid-19 Centro de Testes
Covid-19 Centro de Testes, Caldas da Rainha

Vaccination Center, (Centro de Vacinação) Portugal
Centro de Vacinação, Caldas da Rainha

Vaccination Center, Portugal
Queuing at the vaccination center

Queuing at the vaccination center
Waiting in turn

Queuing at the vaccination center
The wait is nearly over

Covid-19 sign
Safety sign

© PortugalVisitor.com

774 Lisbon Bus

774 Lisbon Bus

The 774 bus in Lisbon runs from Campo Ourique (Prazeres) to Gomes Freire. The 774 connects with Rato Station on the Lisbon metro and also stops just south of busy Marques de Pombal.

774 Lisbon Bus
774 Lisbon Bus


Schedule

The first bus from Campo Ourique (Prazeres) is at 6.24 am Monday to Friday with the last bus at 1.14 am. At peak times in the morning and evening up to 6 buses run per hour. On Saturdays, Sundays, and national holidays, the timetable is slightly different with less frequency.

From Gomes Freire the first bus on weekdays is at 6.00 am with the last bus at 12.45 am.

Other Lisbon bus routes covered include the following routes 714727728, 730736, 758767, and 783.

774 Lisbon Bus
774 Lisbon Bus